Group of happy kids running through green field

At school, physical activity is linked with academic achievement. Planning opportunities and places for kids to move more helps them achieve more. In or out-of-school physical activity balances eating choices.

Ingredients

Equal parts:

  • School Actions
  • Family Involvement
  • Community Support

Directions:

  1. Mix together classroom movement, school recess and physical education.
  2. Stir in family involvement (using activities like walking, biking, and weekly tips).
  3. Fold in community support by conducting walkability & bikeability checklists and sharing information with school and community leaders, as well as the media.
  4. Pour into policies and practices and “bake” until well set.

Note: Many communities and schools hold yearly spring walk or bike to school events, which is a great way to motivate kids to move more.

School/Community Resources include:

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Build Parental Interest

April 17, 2018

Family Outing to the Grocery Store

This month’s WOWS Newsletter suggests planting a seed to create a plan for nutrition activities; it also includes tips for encouraging parental interest in healthy eating and physical activity. Use the following ideas to increase attendance at events.

  • Consider holding a raffle. Ask for a community donation and offer low-cost tickets for drawing items that offer opportunities for more active playtime such as: a bicycle, baseball, football, basketball or soccer ball, and tickets or gift certificates to water parks, miniature golf, and sporting events.
  • Involve students in a presentation or fun skit (nutrition-physical activity connected). Parents love to come see their children perform.
  • Include food – not a meal, just a tasting to control cost, or ask for community donations.
  • Offer to take and make family photos available. For the photo, have individuals hold their favorite piece of sports equipment or fruit or vegetable.
  • Advertise – promote – advertise – announce – advertise – promote – advertise – announce…

What Kids Know

April 2, 2018

Cute elementary children having lunch at school

As nutrition educators, it is always a little surprising to realize what kids know. When it comes to healthy eating, sometimes they “know” more than we think they do, and other times they can be “pretty far off base.” Nutrition misinformation and sensationalized studies can make it confusing for all of us. The frequent new “this or that” diets or recommendations make it even more important for nutrition education to help kids:

1. Understand the “basics” of healthy eating choices and how to use tools like MyPlate.

2. Understand how to identify healthy habits and the skills needed for balanced choices.

3. Adopt positive attitudes and build skills for healthy habits:

  • Develop cooking skills to:
    • Learn how healthier foods can be tasty choices
    • Experience the difference “colorful” plates can make
    • Develop more variety of food choices
  • Understand how all foods can fit in a diet with healthy choices
  • Find enjoyable ways to balance eating intake with physical activity

4. Help to make healthier options from which to choose available.

A recent WOWS Newsletter thought for the week is from Henry J. Kaiser: “Find a need and fill it.” We know there is a need; let’s fill it one step at a time.

Family At Home In Eating Meal Together

A number of smaller “bits” of healthy changes over time can add up to make a big difference. At home or at school, changing our own habits and way of thinking is just as easy as practicing small changes.

It is still common to hear parents and teachers talk about rewarding kids with sweets like ice cream or a school pizza party. The concern is not because the kids are having ice cream or pizza, which can be part of a balanced eating plan. It is the consistent use of foods (very often sweets) that is perceived as a reward by the child…a habit that can be carried through life. Each month in 2018, choose several small “bits” of change. Practice helps form healthy habits to last a lifetime.

Ideas to Start the Year

  1. Turn off whichever screen is on (TV, computer, phone) while eating at home. Instead, talk with your family members.
  2. Put snacks on a plate instead of eating from a bag or box.
  3. Use fun physical activity as a reward. Anyone for miniature golf or a scavenger hunt in the park?
  4. Drink water instead of sugary beverages.
  5. Try a fruit or vegetable that you don’t usually eat.
  6. Tune up your “hunger meter.” Eat and enjoy small bites. Stop eating when you are pleasantly (instead of uncomfortably) full.

doctor check heart by stethoscope to obese asian boy

We strive to look at the positive rather than focus on the negative; however, sometimes we all need to take a step back and look at what is happening. A November 2017 study reported in the New England Journal of Medicine projects that more than half of today’s children are expected to be obese at the age of 35 years, with about half of the occurrence happening during childhood.

While we have moved forward to reverse this trend, there are many other issues to address as well as new ones popping up here and there. There are still too many unhealthy snacks; too much screen time and too little physical activity; too much fast food; too many sugary drinks; and portion sizes that are out of control. The reality is that together we do have the power to make a change. We can make healthier alternatives more available, develop skills to make balanced food choices, and increase the enjoyment of moving more.

We can and need to take action in a positive way. This means working to meet the Challenge with “guilt free” environments and strategies that focus on health and feeling good, rather than on weight. Each of us can be a change maker. Think of all the places you can support healthier eating choices and help kids to sit less and move more. Start the conversation today.

Kids Reflect What We Do

December 27, 2017

Family Enjoying Meal At Home

Each issue of the WOWS Newsletter includes an inspiration quote. In the most recent issue is a quote from Ralph Waldo Emerson: What you do speaks so loudly that I cannot hear what you say.

When it comes to developing healthy eating habits for children, that quote is very relevant. Just as important as the way parents talk about food is the way in which they choose to eat.

Children can also pick up on their parents’ attitudes about food. As role models, parents need to make sure they’re demonstrating a healthy attitude toward food so their children do, too.

Research shows that family mealtimes have a big impact on how children eat as they grow into adulthood and start making food choices of their own. One study showed that children who eat meals with their parents tend to eat more fruit, vegetables and dairy products than children who don’t. There is also research that shows that when parents increase their physical activity, kids do too.

Holidays are a great time to start making healthful eating the standard at home and at work. What you do everywhere you live, learn, work and play is reflected in your attitudes. Healthful behaviors don’t require giving up all the things you enjoy. In fact, the healthy attitude is that in a normal diet there are no good or bad foods, only the way in which you choose them. Making healthful choices comes down to developing healthy habits that guide balance.

Move More for Holiday Balance

December 11, 2017

Gym Class

Active play and healthful eating choices make up the equation for healthy balance. Most kids aren’t getting the recommended hour a day of physical activity, and it is even harder during the cold winter days. The holidays are an especially good time to get creative.

Because kids tend to be more motivated to participate in something they helped create, give the following activity a try!

  • Have kids create their own minutes of motion game.
  • Explain the goal is to create a minimum of 12 “roll and do” activities.
  • The materials needed include one dice, a stopwatch and 12 large index cards.
  • The instructions for the activities will be written on the index cards and will include:
    1. A specified amount of time to perform the activity from 1-6 (the numbers indicated by rolling one dice). For example, 1=30 seconds; 2=45 seconds; 3=60 seconds, and so on.
    2. At least two index cards for every number on the dice (a total of 12 different activities). Specify a physical activity for each card. It might be fun to use a “holiday theme” for the physical activity such as:
      • Dashing Through the Snow (jogging in place)
      • Jingle Bells (make a shaker out of an empty water bottle and un-popped corn or dry beans, then jingle the shakers up high and down low)
      • Winter Wonderland (pretend to ice skate)
      • Frosty the Snowman (pretend to build a snowman)
      • Jingle Bell Rock (rock the body and the shakers)
      • Let it Snow (pretend to ski)
    3. Kids will roll the dice and perform the activity for the number of minutes on the dice.
  • Optional: Play the song while performing the activity.
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