Active Play Their Way

June 23, 2017

Multiracial group of friends walking at the beach

Help families recognize that if they are not getting minimum levels of physical activity each day, it is time to do something different. Kids need at least 60 minutes of physical activity a day.

Youth leaders and educators can send healthy messages and lead by example:

  • Include fun summertime ideas in newsletters and on websites. Include information on opportunities in your community such as water splash parks, playgrounds and nature trails.
  • Create bulletin boards and talk about different activity ideas.
  • In summer programs, plan “brain breaks” during which kids “act out” different suggestions that help them “move more.” For example, make the motions and pretend to play badminton, volleyball, tennis, swimming (all the different strokes) and baseball.
  • Plan a scavenger hunt that keeps kids moving. This week’s WOWS Newsletter has several fun ideas.

fruits and vegetables background

It is National Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Month and June 23rd is National Picnic Day! Plan a picnic menu to include fruit and veggie finger foods! Use the Picnic Checklist in the June 14th WOWS Newsletter, and then plan to add some of the following menu suggestions to your picnic basket.

Picnic Basket Fruit and Veggie Suggestions:

  • Make fruit kabobs, or for greater transporting ease, fill individual sandwich bags with colorful cubes of fruit.
  • Try the fun Kids Eat Right Chocolate Ladybugs Recipe. The only two ingredients are fresh whole strawberries and semi-sweet dark chocolate chips.
  • Build fruit sandwiches: Spread graham crackers with peanut butter and use sliced banana or apple as a filling.
  • Ants on a log: Spread celery with peanut butter and top with raisins or other dried fruit pieces.
  • Cucumber sandwiches: Cut the cucumber in “coins.” Spread one “coin” with hummus or low fat cream cheese and top with another “coin.” As an option add deli meat or low fat cheese.
  • Assorted veggie sticks: Zucchini, carrots, celery, pea pods and green-yellow-orange-and red peppers.

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This week’s WOWS Newsletter guides educators or parents through an easy-to-prepare recipe. The recipe and suggested activities make a very good addition to this summer’s Healthy Me Journal.

In the newsletter, the learning exercise following the recipe points to a link in the ChooseMyPlate.gov website to help kids gain some understanding of recommended food group amounts. As ChooseMyPlate states, the key to healthy eating is choosing a variety of foods and beverages from each food group.

Visuals are helpful for learning. The MyPlate image is one visual that guides healthy choices. Everyday objects can also help kids visualize portion sizes. Collect and talk about the following items:

1 cup = a baseball                                                      3 oz. muffin or biscuit = a hockey puck

½ cup = a cupcake wrapper full                             3 oz. meat or chicken = a deck of cards

1 oz. (2 Tbsp) = a golf ball                                        2 Tbsp. peanut butter = a ping pong ball

Group of happy kids running through green field

We enjoy healthy balance with tasty and smart food choices paired with Active Play, Every Day. Move with fun summertime activities, like the ones below! For more summertime “balancing moves,” see the May 31st Healthy Kids Challenge WOWS Newsletter.

Create a fun fitness course:

  1. Place two buckets several steps apart. Fill one with water and keep the other empty. Give kids a plastic cup and have them, using the cup, race to see who can transfer water from the full bucket to the empty one first.
  2. Set up a bean bag toss with hula hoops. Place three hula hoops on the ground in the shape of a triangle. Have kids try to get a bean bag within the circle of all three hoops.
  3. Run a “Ball and Glove Relay.”
    • Supplies: gallon milk jugs, with the bottoms cut off (to use like ball gloves) and tennis balls.
    • Divide kids into teams, and give each team one milk jug “ball glove” and one tennis ball.
    • Have each team line up and explain the relay:
      • The first person in line is the catcher and holds the milk jug. He stands a few feet from the rest of the kids on his team. (The distance from the pitcher to the catcher depends on the age of the child.)
      • The second kid in line on that team is the pitcher and tosses the ball underhanded to the kid with the milk jug.
      • When the ball is caught (they should try again if they miss!), the pitcher moves to become the catcher, the catcher moves to the end of the line and the game continues until everyone has had a turn. If teams are small, do two or three turns.

Note: Instead of declaring winners or losers, have game leaders time each team; then have the teams do the relay again and see if they can improve their time. Encourage teams to create a team name and cheer.

Healthy Taste Appeal

May 22, 2017

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Create appeal for healthy foods by pleasing the senses with its appearance, smell, texture and mouth-feel. These are the sensations that create taste and enjoyment.

A meal of cold turkey slices, white bread, pears and vanilla pudding has little appeal. All the foods are white, soft, cold and fairly bland. A meal with variety of colors, flavors, textures and temperature increases enjoyment. Substitute strawberries and green grapes for the pear. And heat turkey slices with low fat cheese, sautéed green peppers and onion on a whole grain bun.

A variety of tastes, such as salty and sweet and spicy and bland, as well as strong flavors and light flavors are all factors in creating appeal. When it comes to texture, variety counts here too. A variety of crunchy and smooth, soft and firm makes a difference.

Experiment with the factors that add healthy appeal

Add a “bit” of veggie for crunch and/or color:

  1. Sprinkle grated carrots on sandwiches with lettuce & tomato.
  2. Add extra chopped veggies to a frozen pizza before baking, or to canned soup before heating.

Create appeal with a creative “twist” to the usual:

  1. Instead of a bowl of juice packed peaches, try topping ½ cup unsweetened, canned peaches with a sprinkle of cinnamon and 2 Tbsp. crushed graham cracker crumbs; heat in the microwave until warm.
  2. Instead of a plain graham cracker, try spreading a graham cracker with low fat cream cheese (or peanut butter) and topping with a banana slice.
  3. Instead of juice packed crushed pineapple, try mixing ½ cup of juice packed crushed pineapple with ½ cup frozen berries or ¼ cup dried fruit.
  4. Instead of waffles and syrup, try topping whole wheat toaster waffles with a tablespoon of peanut butter and banana, strawberry and kiwi slices.

Use these and other ideas to add to the Healthy Me summertime journal.

Friends in summer

Teachers, youth leaders and teams find HKC wellness approaches and action ideas effective and easy to use. They report that the HKC tools provide great new strategies for teaching core curriculum. One of the successful strategies is repetition of healthy habit messages using the Healthy6.

Six healthy eat, move and enjoy balance life step goals relate to eating and physical activity components identified by the Centers for Disease Control and National Health Education Standards. Hands-on lessons develop positive attitudes and practical skills for healthy choices.

The creation of a summertime journal, as discussed in this month’s newsletters and blogs, incorporates a number of hands-on lessons and personalizes learning. As kids work on the journal, they are helped to understand that healthy habits don’t just happen. They are the result of practicing…another way of saying it is “be the change you want to see” until it becomes a habit.

Goal setting and “challenges” to motivate and measure progress is one way to personalize learning. For example:

  • First, determine how many fruits and vegetables you are eating each day and how that compares to a healthy intake (see ChooseMyPlate.gov for recommendations). Then, create a fruits and vegetables goal towards a healthy intake. Such as, eat one more fruit or vegetable each day. Then set a “challenge” to achieve that goal every day for the next week. On a calendar, record the number of fruits and/or vegetables eaten each day. For each day the goal was reached, place a star on the calendar.
  • Use the same plan to set a goal and a “challenge” for more minutes of physical activity in the day.

Homemade yogurt ice popsicles with fresh kiwi

Developing healthy eating and physical activity habits that last a lifetime does not require that a parent or teacher become a “monitor.” In fact, doing the opposite creates the most success. With activities like the summer journaling that is discussed in the May 10th WOWS Newsletter, kids can have so much fun they will not think about all they are learning.

  • Try new healthy snack recipes. Suggest they write the recipe in their journal. After tasting the recipe, have them rate with an image of their choosing, such as 5 stars (or apples) for the best. If the recipe doesn’t make the 5 star rating, talk about what they liked or didn’t like about it.
  • Have kids create their own recipe. Have them write measures and directions for preparing the recipe. Suggest ingredients; fruits are always a healthy bet. Other suggested ingredients to accompany the fruits might include low fat pudding (or yogurt), fat free cream cheese, dry cereal and a graham cracker.
  • Come up with active play ideas to keep them moving. Calculate the number of minutes they will add to the day – week – and month.
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