School Caferteria Line

Preschools and daycare centers can help build a foundation for healthy eating and physical activity choices. In the most recent WOWS Newsletter, we shared the three actions that will help make a difference that lasts for a lifetime:

  1. Plan fun, hands-on learning activities
  2. Model and repeat the healthy message… play, taste and learn with kids
  3. Share the message with parents and caregivers

A 4th category of actions are “nudges.” We’ve used this term in our columns before. It is a word made popular by Cornell University’s Smarter Lunchrooms Movement.

Nudges are like the things retail marketers use to encourage consumers to buy. Good examples are retail store end caps or products placed by the checkout lanes. When it comes to kids’ places, consider these successful “nudges”:

  • A 2016 study reported in Pediatrics found that in school cafeterias with vinyl banners depicting vegetable superhero characters, more young children took vegetables from the salad bar.
  • Studies have also shown an increase in the selection of healthier foods when they are at eye level. In one example, preschoolers took cartons of lower fat milk when they were easier to reach than the higher fat choice.
  • Encouraging students to take fruits and veggies as they go through the line increases selections.
  • Giving fun menu names to fruits and veggies “nudges” healthier choices. So the next time you post a menu, have fun with creative names, like “Crunch a Bunch Salad,” “Rocket Carrots” or “To-My-Toes Tomatoes.” Better yet, help kids come up with silly names!

Make a Healthy Difference, Learn – Model – Share – and Nudge

The perfect entertainment snack

Whenever a change in the status quo is made, one of the first questions that come to mind is “Will making healthier substitutions cause us to lose customers or make money?”

According to a study published in the Journal of Public Health, an Iowa High School showed success is possible!

The school focused on adding just eight healthy options, including carrots, apples, a grilled chicken sandwich and string cheese. They also replaced regular nacho cheese sauce with a no trans fat variety and prepared popcorn with canola oil rather than coconut oil to make it trans fat free and lower in saturated fat. The results showed an income increase of 4 percent and, although student satisfaction was not affected, parental satisfaction increased. In addition, sales of the modified nachos and popcorn increased.

As reported in “Celebrating Healthy,” the Minnesota Department of Health found similar results.

After making changes for healthier foods, the Edina Aquatic Center increased profits by 12 percent between 2011 and 2012, the Richfield pool increased profits by 20 percent and the Dwan Golf Club decreased food costs by 6 percent!

These studies and others support the potential for the successful addition of healthier concession foods. Knowing of the success of these leading concession operations will make it easier for others to make healthier menu changes.

Children having picnic and eating strawberries in garden

Every day, there are a multitude of things that influence our eating choices. Too often, those influences trend toward over-consuming added sugars and unhealthy fats. The July 5th WOWS Newsletter activity guides kids in thinking about the influence of the healthy habits we value and practice, and how friends and the media can make a difference in the choices we make. By itself, just the availability of sugary and higher fat foods in so many settings (fast foods and at concession stands, parties and celebrations…list goes on) is an influence.

Among the influencers are television commercials and other media ads. Think of the really yummy-looking posters of foods you see in fast food restaurants. They are designed to make us want to choose them. It is helpful to recognize the impact these influences can have on you. Those influences become a problem when we bend to temptation and frequently over-consume. If we value and practice healthy habits such as having smaller, less frequent amounts of sugary and higher fat foods as a way to looking and feeling our best, it is easier to recognize the temptation and make choices to resist over-consuming.

As in the example above, recognizing influencers is a step toward healthy balance. It is also helpful to have a basic understanding of the results of the choices we make. An example is recognizing how much sugar is too much. There are two slightly different guidelines they we often see; one is from the American Heart Association (AHA) and the other is defined in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA). Because the AHA recommendation is based on maximum amounts and the 2015 DGA recommendation depends on a percentage of daily calories, it can seem a little confusing. However, so many Americans are consuming much greater amounts than either of the recommendations, so using either guideline can help us curb our intake of sugar.

Do the “why’s (influencers) of eating choices” make a difference in your balance? You decide!

fruits and vegetables background

It is National Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Month and June 23rd is National Picnic Day! Plan a picnic menu to include fruit and veggie finger foods! Use the Picnic Checklist in the June 14th WOWS Newsletter, and then plan to add some of the following menu suggestions to your picnic basket.

Picnic Basket Fruit and Veggie Suggestions:

  • Make fruit kabobs, or for greater transporting ease, fill individual sandwich bags with colorful cubes of fruit.
  • Try the fun Kids Eat Right Chocolate Ladybugs Recipe. The only two ingredients are fresh whole strawberries and semi-sweet dark chocolate chips.
  • Build fruit sandwiches: Spread graham crackers with peanut butter and use sliced banana or apple as a filling.
  • Ants on a log: Spread celery with peanut butter and top with raisins or other dried fruit pieces.
  • Cucumber sandwiches: Cut the cucumber in “coins.” Spread one “coin” with hummus or low fat cream cheese and top with another “coin.” As an option add deli meat or low fat cheese.
  • Assorted veggie sticks: Zucchini, carrots, celery, pea pods and green-yellow-orange-and red peppers.

myplate_yellow_livetype copy

This week’s WOWS Newsletter guides educators or parents through an easy-to-prepare recipe. The recipe and suggested activities make a very good addition to this summer’s Healthy Me Journal.

In the newsletter, the learning exercise following the recipe points to a link in the ChooseMyPlate.gov website to help kids gain some understanding of recommended food group amounts. As ChooseMyPlate states, the key to healthy eating is choosing a variety of foods and beverages from each food group.

Visuals are helpful for learning. The MyPlate image is one visual that guides healthy choices. Everyday objects can also help kids visualize portion sizes. Collect and talk about the following items:

1 cup = a baseball                                                      3 oz. muffin or biscuit = a hockey puck

½ cup = a cupcake wrapper full                             3 oz. meat or chicken = a deck of cards

1 oz. (2 Tbsp) = a golf ball                                        2 Tbsp. peanut butter = a ping pong ball

Healthy Taste Appeal

May 22, 2017

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Create appeal for healthy foods by pleasing the senses with its appearance, smell, texture and mouth-feel. These are the sensations that create taste and enjoyment.

A meal of cold turkey slices, white bread, pears and vanilla pudding has little appeal. All the foods are white, soft, cold and fairly bland. A meal with variety of colors, flavors, textures and temperature increases enjoyment. Substitute strawberries and green grapes for the pear. And heat turkey slices with low fat cheese, sautéed green peppers and onion on a whole grain bun.

A variety of tastes, such as salty and sweet and spicy and bland, as well as strong flavors and light flavors are all factors in creating appeal. When it comes to texture, variety counts here too. A variety of crunchy and smooth, soft and firm makes a difference.

Experiment with the factors that add healthy appeal

Add a “bit” of veggie for crunch and/or color:

  1. Sprinkle grated carrots on sandwiches with lettuce & tomato.
  2. Add extra chopped veggies to a frozen pizza before baking, or to canned soup before heating.

Create appeal with a creative “twist” to the usual:

  1. Instead of a bowl of juice packed peaches, try topping ½ cup unsweetened, canned peaches with a sprinkle of cinnamon and 2 Tbsp. crushed graham cracker crumbs; heat in the microwave until warm.
  2. Instead of a plain graham cracker, try spreading a graham cracker with low fat cream cheese (or peanut butter) and topping with a banana slice.
  3. Instead of juice packed crushed pineapple, try mixing ½ cup of juice packed crushed pineapple with ½ cup frozen berries or ¼ cup dried fruit.
  4. Instead of waffles and syrup, try topping whole wheat toaster waffles with a tablespoon of peanut butter and banana, strawberry and kiwi slices.

Use these and other ideas to add to the Healthy Me summertime journal.

Friends in summer

Teachers, youth leaders and teams find HKC wellness approaches and action ideas effective and easy to use. They report that the HKC tools provide great new strategies for teaching core curriculum. One of the successful strategies is repetition of healthy habit messages using the Healthy6.

Six healthy eat, move and enjoy balance life step goals relate to eating and physical activity components identified by the Centers for Disease Control and National Health Education Standards. Hands-on lessons develop positive attitudes and practical skills for healthy choices.

The creation of a summertime journal, as discussed in this month’s newsletters and blogs, incorporates a number of hands-on lessons and personalizes learning. As kids work on the journal, they are helped to understand that healthy habits don’t just happen. They are the result of practicing…another way of saying it is “be the change you want to see” until it becomes a habit.

Goal setting and “challenges” to motivate and measure progress is one way to personalize learning. For example:

  • First, determine how many fruits and vegetables you are eating each day and how that compares to a healthy intake (see ChooseMyPlate.gov for recommendations). Then, create a fruits and vegetables goal towards a healthy intake. Such as, eat one more fruit or vegetable each day. Then set a “challenge” to achieve that goal every day for the next week. On a calendar, record the number of fruits and/or vegetables eaten each day. For each day the goal was reached, place a star on the calendar.
  • Use the same plan to set a goal and a “challenge” for more minutes of physical activity in the day.
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