Drinking fountain

The availability of water in schools is just one example of the multitude of reasons Wellness Councils are key to resolving barriers and creating solutions for healthy changes.

Increasing the availability of water in schools does indeed come with its own challenges. School food service departments must operate as nonprofits, yet they need to make enough money to be self-sufficient. While water is required, it is not considered to be a part of the reimbursable meal. This means there is no separate funding for equipment like cups and pitchers or water dispensers. Wellness Councils can help by taking the following steps:

  • Identify and take action for school needs (such as the availability of water) and opportunities.
  • Develop community partnerships, collaboration and fundraising for support.
  • Keep communication open with students, parents, and the community as to the needs and progress.
  • Develop and support campaigns to promote wellness opportunities or work with local organizations on a community-wide promotion campaign.

“The world will not change until we do.” — Jim Wallis


doctor check heart by stethoscope to obese asian boy

We strive to look at the positive rather than focus on the negative; however, sometimes we all need to take a step back and look at what is happening. A November 2017 study reported in the New England Journal of Medicine projects that more than half of today’s children are expected to be obese at the age of 35 years, with about half of the occurrence happening during childhood.

While we have moved forward to reverse this trend, there are many other issues to address as well as new ones popping up here and there. There are still too many unhealthy snacks; too much screen time and too little physical activity; too much fast food; too many sugary drinks; and portion sizes that are out of control. The reality is that together we do have the power to make a change. We can make healthier alternatives more available, develop skills to make balanced food choices, and increase the enjoyment of moving more.

We can and need to take action in a positive way. This means working to meet the Challenge with “guilt free” environments and strategies that focus on health and feeling good, rather than on weight. Each of us can be a change maker. Think of all the places you can support healthier eating choices and help kids to sit less and move more. Start the conversation today.

Kids Reflect What We Do

December 27, 2017

Family Enjoying Meal At Home

Each issue of the WOWS Newsletter includes an inspiration quote. In the most recent issue is a quote from Ralph Waldo Emerson: What you do speaks so loudly that I cannot hear what you say.

When it comes to developing healthy eating habits for children, that quote is very relevant. Just as important as the way parents talk about food is the way in which they choose to eat.

Children can also pick up on their parents’ attitudes about food. As role models, parents need to make sure they’re demonstrating a healthy attitude toward food so their children do, too.

Research shows that family mealtimes have a big impact on how children eat as they grow into adulthood and start making food choices of their own. One study showed that children who eat meals with their parents tend to eat more fruit, vegetables and dairy products than children who don’t. There is also research that shows that when parents increase their physical activity, kids do too.

Holidays are a great time to start making healthful eating the standard at home and at work. What you do everywhere you live, learn, work and play is reflected in your attitudes. Healthful behaviors don’t require giving up all the things you enjoy. In fact, the healthy attitude is that in a normal diet there are no good or bad foods, only the way in which you choose them. Making healthful choices comes down to developing healthy habits that guide balance.

Move More for Holiday Balance

December 11, 2017

Gym Class

Active play and healthful eating choices make up the equation for healthy balance. Most kids aren’t getting the recommended hour a day of physical activity, and it is even harder during the cold winter days. The holidays are an especially good time to get creative.

Because kids tend to be more motivated to participate in something they helped create, give the following activity a try!

  • Have kids create their own minutes of motion game.
  • Explain the goal is to create a minimum of 12 “roll and do” activities.
  • The materials needed include one dice, a stopwatch and 12 large index cards.
  • The instructions for the activities will be written on the index cards and will include:
    1. A specified amount of time to perform the activity from 1-6 (the numbers indicated by rolling one dice). For example, 1=30 seconds; 2=45 seconds; 3=60 seconds, and so on.
    2. At least two index cards for every number on the dice (a total of 12 different activities). Specify a physical activity for each card. It might be fun to use a “holiday theme” for the physical activity such as:
      • Dashing Through the Snow (jogging in place)
      • Jingle Bells (make a shaker out of an empty water bottle and un-popped corn or dry beans, then jingle the shakers up high and down low)
      • Winter Wonderland (pretend to ice skate)
      • Frosty the Snowman (pretend to build a snowman)
      • Jingle Bell Rock (rock the body and the shakers)
      • Let it Snow (pretend to ski)
    3. Kids will roll the dice and perform the activity for the number of minutes on the dice.
  • Optional: Play the song while performing the activity.

Meeting the Holiday Challenge

November 27, 2017

Multi Generation Family Eating Lunch At Kitchen Table

The holidays are a good time to think about what is actually a “smart serving”!

No wonder it is hard for us to recognize a “smart serving.” We’ve become aware, over the years, that portion sizes have grown in restaurants and by manufacturers but may not recognize all of the ways they have become a “new normal.”

Think about it. Automobile manufacturers have expanded the size of cup holders to accommodate larger sizes of drinks. Our plates and other dishes are larger than those of years ago. Even in classic cookbooks, recipe servings have increased. When it comes to holiday comfort foods and goodies, it seems that too often we develop an attitude of all things go. And too often, around the New Year, we begin to regret it.

Using the following tips, it is possible to enjoy those holiday foods and develop healthier holiday habits:

  • Offer fruits and/or vegetables every time food is served. The fiber, volume and lower caloric density of these foods help to fill you up.
  • Cut desserts in half or serve in small portions.
  • Eat slowly and recognize feelings of fullness. Stop when feeling pleasantly full instead of uncomfortably full.
  • Rather than skipping meals, choose to eat them on a regular schedule.
  • Put food on a plate so you recognize how much you are eating.

The following recipe from The American Diabetes Association is an example of a portion controlled, festive holiday snack or side dish.

Caprese Kabobs


  • 18 bamboo mini forks or small skewers
  • 18 grape tomatoes
  • 18 small basil leaves, folded in half
  • 18 fresh mozzarella balls (1/4 ounce each)


  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1½ tablespoons balsamic vinegar


  • Place 1 grape tomato, 1 basil leaf, and 1 mozzarella ball on each bamboo fork/skewer. Repeat this process for 18 kabobs. Place the kabobs on a serving platter.
  • In a small bowl, whisk together the dressing ingredients. Right before serving, pour the dressing over the kabobs to coat evenly.

Healthy body healthy mind

The “secrets” of healthy eating include variety, moderation and balance. A consistent, repeated message is one key to learning. A daily, or even weekly, message targeted not just to knowledge, but also attitude and healthy behavior, is the aim. In the classroom, plan 5-10 minute nutrition education or physical activity brain breaks. It doesn’t have to be complex:

Nutrition Ed

  • Discuss how MyPlate shows us how to choose a variety of foods from different food groups.
  • Talk about moderation. What is it and how do we choose it? Point out how MyPlate gives us serving sizes for the foods we eat and also recommends the number of servings we should eat for our age, gender and how active we are.
  • Talk about how eating a healthy breakfast can make school easier. Breakfast provides morning “Go Power.”

Brain Breaks

  • Talk about how moving more balances “energy in” from the foods we eat with “energy out” for a healthy heart and weight. While moving, ask kids to call out their favorite choices for active play.
  • Between lessons, have kids do jumping jacks, jog in place or act out sports like swimming, tennis or basketball.
  • Play five minutes of “musical desks.”

If time is limited to implement a full comprehensive nutrition education curriculum, do something else. There are many “One-a-Day” ideas to help fill a gap. Contact Healthy Kids Challenge for more ideas. The Healthy Kids Challenge Balance My Day™ curriculum is full of discussion points, hands-on activities and worksheets.

School Caferteria Line

Preschools and daycare centers can help build a foundation for healthy eating and physical activity choices. In the most recent WOWS Newsletter, we shared the three actions that will help make a difference that lasts for a lifetime:

  1. Plan fun, hands-on learning activities
  2. Model and repeat the healthy message… play, taste and learn with kids
  3. Share the message with parents and caregivers

A 4th category of actions are “nudges.” We’ve used this term in our columns before. It is a word made popular by Cornell University’s Smarter Lunchrooms Movement.

Nudges are like the things retail marketers use to encourage consumers to buy. Good examples are retail store end caps or products placed by the checkout lanes. When it comes to kids’ places, consider these successful “nudges”:

  • A 2016 study reported in Pediatrics found that in school cafeterias with vinyl banners depicting vegetable superhero characters, more young children took vegetables from the salad bar.
  • Studies have also shown an increase in the selection of healthier foods when they are at eye level. In one example, preschoolers took cartons of lower fat milk when they were easier to reach than the higher fat choice.
  • Encouraging students to take fruits and veggies as they go through the line increases selections.
  • Giving fun menu names to fruits and veggies “nudges” healthier choices. So the next time you post a menu, have fun with creative names, like “Crunch a Bunch Salad,” “Rocket Carrots” or “To-My-Toes Tomatoes.” Better yet, help kids come up with silly names!

Make a Healthy Difference, Learn – Model – Share – and Nudge

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