What Kids Know

April 2, 2018

Cute elementary children having lunch at school

As nutrition educators, it is always a little surprising to realize what kids know. When it comes to healthy eating, sometimes they “know” more than we think they do, and other times they can be “pretty far off base.” Nutrition misinformation and sensationalized studies can make it confusing for all of us. The frequent new “this or that” diets or recommendations make it even more important for nutrition education to help kids:

1. Understand the “basics” of healthy eating choices and how to use tools like MyPlate.

2. Understand how to identify healthy habits and the skills needed for balanced choices.

3. Adopt positive attitudes and build skills for healthy habits:

  • Develop cooking skills to:
    • Learn how healthier foods can be tasty choices
    • Experience the difference “colorful” plates can make
    • Develop more variety of food choices
  • Understand how all foods can fit in a diet with healthy choices
  • Find enjoyable ways to balance eating intake with physical activity

4. Help to make healthier options from which to choose available.

A recent WOWS Newsletter thought for the week is from Henry J. Kaiser: “Find a need and fill it.” We know there is a need; let’s fill it one step at a time.

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Cute toddler boy in supermarket choosing fresh organic carrots

Knowledge of nutrition without application leads nowhere. Be a “change helper” by helping kids recognize healthy habits; inspiring positive attitudes; identifying and developing skills; and setting realistic goals. The following example identifies a healthy habit and focuses on one of a number of skills for making “Smart Servings.”

Healthy Habit Goal: Choose “Smart Servings”
An activity that targets skills for recognizing and choosing less of foods high in saturated fat and added sugar.

Ask kids to:

  1. Identify their favorite snack foods and list them on a board.
  2. Review the list and identify snacks that might be higher in fat and/or sugar.
  3. Bring in package labels or search for product nutrition facts labels online.
    – Review the labels for serving sizes and compare to typical intake.
    – Check fat and added sugar content.
    – Rank the order of foods from those highest to lowest in fat. Do the same for added sugar.
  4. Talk about strategies for lowering fat and added sugar intake (answer: smaller servings or choosing those foods less often, or making another lower fat/sugar choice).
  5. Talk about whether or not they would use those strategies to make a change. If not, identify the barriers and possible solutions.

Drinking fountain

The availability of water in schools is just one example of the multitude of reasons Wellness Councils are key to resolving barriers and creating solutions for healthy changes.

Increasing the availability of water in schools does indeed come with its own challenges. School food service departments must operate as nonprofits, yet they need to make enough money to be self-sufficient. While water is required, it is not considered to be a part of the reimbursable meal. This means there is no separate funding for equipment like cups and pitchers or water dispensers. Wellness Councils can help by taking the following steps:

  • Identify and take action for school needs (such as the availability of water) and opportunities.
  • Develop community partnerships, collaboration and fundraising for support.
  • Keep communication open with students, parents, and the community as to the needs and progress.
  • Develop and support campaigns to promote wellness opportunities or work with local organizations on a community-wide promotion campaign.

“The world will not change until we do.” — Jim Wallis

doctor check heart by stethoscope to obese asian boy

We strive to look at the positive rather than focus on the negative; however, sometimes we all need to take a step back and look at what is happening. A November 2017 study reported in the New England Journal of Medicine projects that more than half of today’s children are expected to be obese at the age of 35 years, with about half of the occurrence happening during childhood.

While we have moved forward to reverse this trend, there are many other issues to address as well as new ones popping up here and there. There are still too many unhealthy snacks; too much screen time and too little physical activity; too much fast food; too many sugary drinks; and portion sizes that are out of control. The reality is that together we do have the power to make a change. We can make healthier alternatives more available, develop skills to make balanced food choices, and increase the enjoyment of moving more.

We can and need to take action in a positive way. This means working to meet the Challenge with “guilt free” environments and strategies that focus on health and feeling good, rather than on weight. Each of us can be a change maker. Think of all the places you can support healthier eating choices and help kids to sit less and move more. Start the conversation today.

Kids Reflect What We Do

December 27, 2017

Family Enjoying Meal At Home

Each issue of the WOWS Newsletter includes an inspiration quote. In the most recent issue is a quote from Ralph Waldo Emerson: What you do speaks so loudly that I cannot hear what you say.

When it comes to developing healthy eating habits for children, that quote is very relevant. Just as important as the way parents talk about food is the way in which they choose to eat.

Children can also pick up on their parents’ attitudes about food. As role models, parents need to make sure they’re demonstrating a healthy attitude toward food so their children do, too.

Research shows that family mealtimes have a big impact on how children eat as they grow into adulthood and start making food choices of their own. One study showed that children who eat meals with their parents tend to eat more fruit, vegetables and dairy products than children who don’t. There is also research that shows that when parents increase their physical activity, kids do too.

Holidays are a great time to start making healthful eating the standard at home and at work. What you do everywhere you live, learn, work and play is reflected in your attitudes. Healthful behaviors don’t require giving up all the things you enjoy. In fact, the healthy attitude is that in a normal diet there are no good or bad foods, only the way in which you choose them. Making healthful choices comes down to developing healthy habits that guide balance.

Move More for Holiday Balance

December 11, 2017

Gym Class

Active play and healthful eating choices make up the equation for healthy balance. Most kids aren’t getting the recommended hour a day of physical activity, and it is even harder during the cold winter days. The holidays are an especially good time to get creative.

Because kids tend to be more motivated to participate in something they helped create, give the following activity a try!

  • Have kids create their own minutes of motion game.
  • Explain the goal is to create a minimum of 12 “roll and do” activities.
  • The materials needed include one dice, a stopwatch and 12 large index cards.
  • The instructions for the activities will be written on the index cards and will include:
    1. A specified amount of time to perform the activity from 1-6 (the numbers indicated by rolling one dice). For example, 1=30 seconds; 2=45 seconds; 3=60 seconds, and so on.
    2. At least two index cards for every number on the dice (a total of 12 different activities). Specify a physical activity for each card. It might be fun to use a “holiday theme” for the physical activity such as:
      • Dashing Through the Snow (jogging in place)
      • Jingle Bells (make a shaker out of an empty water bottle and un-popped corn or dry beans, then jingle the shakers up high and down low)
      • Winter Wonderland (pretend to ice skate)
      • Frosty the Snowman (pretend to build a snowman)
      • Jingle Bell Rock (rock the body and the shakers)
      • Let it Snow (pretend to ski)
    3. Kids will roll the dice and perform the activity for the number of minutes on the dice.
  • Optional: Play the song while performing the activity.

Meeting the Holiday Challenge

November 27, 2017

Multi Generation Family Eating Lunch At Kitchen Table

The holidays are a good time to think about what is actually a “smart serving”!

No wonder it is hard for us to recognize a “smart serving.” We’ve become aware, over the years, that portion sizes have grown in restaurants and by manufacturers but may not recognize all of the ways they have become a “new normal.”

Think about it. Automobile manufacturers have expanded the size of cup holders to accommodate larger sizes of drinks. Our plates and other dishes are larger than those of years ago. Even in classic cookbooks, recipe servings have increased. When it comes to holiday comfort foods and goodies, it seems that too often we develop an attitude of all things go. And too often, around the New Year, we begin to regret it.

Using the following tips, it is possible to enjoy those holiday foods and develop healthier holiday habits:

  • Offer fruits and/or vegetables every time food is served. The fiber, volume and lower caloric density of these foods help to fill you up.
  • Cut desserts in half or serve in small portions.
  • Eat slowly and recognize feelings of fullness. Stop when feeling pleasantly full instead of uncomfortably full.
  • Rather than skipping meals, choose to eat them on a regular schedule.
  • Put food on a plate so you recognize how much you are eating.

The following recipe from The American Diabetes Association is an example of a portion controlled, festive holiday snack or side dish.

Caprese Kabobs

Ingredients

  • 18 bamboo mini forks or small skewers
  • 18 grape tomatoes
  • 18 small basil leaves, folded in half
  • 18 fresh mozzarella balls (1/4 ounce each)

Dressing

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1½ tablespoons balsamic vinegar

Instructions

  • Place 1 grape tomato, 1 basil leaf, and 1 mozzarella ball on each bamboo fork/skewer. Repeat this process for 18 kabobs. Place the kabobs on a serving platter.
  • In a small bowl, whisk together the dressing ingredients. Right before serving, pour the dressing over the kabobs to coat evenly.
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