Create a Culture of Health with Healthy Kids Challenge Now

September 7, 2010

Children need a culture of health.  Join HKC as we move to change the culture to one that is conducive to healthy nutrition choices and more physical movement.  HKC supports Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move campaign and its efforts that have already begun the shift toward a culture of health for our children. 

I think recent nutrition and activity news headlines are indicative of the beginnings of this needed culture change.  Here’s one that caught my eye last week, and the whole article is worth a moment of your time: “Behavior changes won’t work on their own without seismic societal shifts, health experts say, because eating too much and exercising too little are merely symptoms of a much larger malady.”  –Fixing a World that Fosters Fat, by Natasha Singer, The New York Times.  You should also check out the Hartman Group’s Wellness 2010:  Balance Redefined market research report.

Here’s a handful of links I’ve found around the web in support a culture of health.  I am posting the title exactly as it is worded on each of these web pages.  It does not imply that Healthy Kids Challenge agrees or disagrees with any of them.  I merely want to illustrate through headlines, the vast complexity of the issue of a cultural shift toward health.

Doctors Write ‘Prescriptions’ For Healthy Fruits and Vegetables

Taxing Caloric Sweetened Beverages to Curb Obesity

Baby Carrots Take On Junk Food With Hip Marketing Campaign

Eliminating Flavored Milk From Schools Shortsighted

Foodlink’s Rochester Farm Stand Hopes to Change Inner-City Diets

If you’re interested in what I do wholeheartedly believe is working to help create a culture of health, check out our Best Practices section of our website.

In the healthy nutrition for children area, for example:

Positive Attitudes for Fruits/Veggies  At the end of the school year 90-95% of students were excited about receiving fruits/vegetables at snack times.

School Cafeteria Increases Fruit/Veggie Eating  “Veggie Dippers” went from 100 to over 200 portions served.

In the physical activity area, here are a couple of examples as well:

Goal Setting Motivates Kids  Each student increased on average 11,400 steps by setting a step goal: the equivalent of an additional 5 miles per student!

Integrating Physical Activity In the School Day  Increased minutes of motion in 100% of classrooms by 30 minutes per week; a 30% increase over the previous year!

One thing I think is for sure, creating a culture of health is going to take all of us working together.  At Healthy Kids Challenge we refer to a person who can help kids make healthy eating and physical activity choices a habit, a KidLinkTM.  All of us can become KidLinks in a culture of health!  Do you see a culture of health forming where you live?

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: